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Why isn’t every traditional publisher out there taking notice of all the great writers?  There was a boom of color writers during the Harlem Renaissance (1919-1940). Later on colored writers did not stop and good thing or we wouldn’t have Toni Morrison, or in the Latin community we wouldn’t have Gabriel Garcia Marquez, or Native Americans like Leslie Marmon Silko and lastly there wouldn’t be any Mideast writers like Khaled Hosseini.  I have read their great works and highly recommend people to step outside of the white bubble the publishing companies push in front of us.  We are a society of mixed cultures.  NO longer a white dominant society.  Writers of every color should be examined by their works and not their skin color.  Wake up! See all the beautiful colors in the world.  Don’t turn a blind eye to a name you don’t recognize. Or you will be missing out on some great stories.famous-authors

 

The Rejectionist | Sarah McCarry: How to Publish Writers of Color: Some Basic Steps for White Folks In the Industry.

writersobsession:

I loved this post by Chuck. There are so many great hints of what agents want. Finally a real look into what they think of you.

Originally posted on Writers In The Storm Blog:

By Chuck Sambuchino

medium_2581582826How does a literary agent define their “ideal client”? The question is extremely important because it’s one that factors into an agent’s mindset before and after they sign you.

If an agent has read your complete novel or book proposal and wants to sign you, the next step is almost always to arrange a telephone call where the two of you get to know one another. You ask the questions you want to ask about her and her style; she does the same regarding you and your style. During the phone conversation, the agent is trying to gauge whether you’re compatible enough with her to be signed as a new author in her stable. She’s already sizing up whether you can be a good, long-term client, or close to it.

Then after you sign with the agent, the two of you begin a long process of working…

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1468803_10151725873696533_2066499872_nIf you haven’t read “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Publishing Children’s Books” then stop reading now.  I read it and somewhat loved it.  The no-nonsense way of telling writers who they can query and who would give a flip is awesome.  I always thought that companies like Scholastic would be open to new authors.  Well they are not.  Even though they might look at your work, they are really closed to new work.  Theses companies want to publish only the authors they have had for years.  The same authors and the same series.  It is their bread and butter.  Sure J.K. Rowling was a new name over ten years ago and sure Scholastic picked her books up.  But does that mean you have the next “Harry Potter” series?  I am pretty sure it’s a “no”.

So the book breaks down what is trade, mass market and independent publishing.  It also breaks down what an agent does and doesn’t do.  Some of the things is pretty standard stuff.  But reading it I thought I would find a golden nugget instead I found flakes of gold through out it.  This is a good thing.  After reading this book you will see that you do have to have connections and everyone in the publishing industry are human and want to be treated as such.  Common sense, right?  Well it should be, but for some writers I know, they tend to think they should do something to stand out in the slush pile.  Big mistakes are made and bridges burnt.  Instead try to learn who is working where and see how great the company is doing.  Is the company getting bought out or the agency closing down?  Is an agent retiring or focusing on their own career?  I looked up an agent once.  I Googled him, facebooked him, and even read his Tweets.  He sounded really good and seemed to be the right fit for me and my work.  Well what I didn’t know until after I queried him was that he just wrote a book.  He asked for my manuscript but was more interested in how his new baby was doing in the market.  Researching agents is tricky because sometimes they are focused on things you don’t know about until they make an announcement.

Publisher’s doors are closed and special invitations are needed to attend the party.  Trying to get in the “in-crowd” is about as difficult as pulling your own wisdom teeth out.  So for all the pain, worry, work, and research you do on your own sometimes it might be best to read a book, like the one I am suggesting above, to give you a clue about what to do next.  This book tells you to join a writing group (I’ve done that), to find writing critique groups (done that too) and to read (done) and write (done) until you have perfected your craft before you query (sigh*).

Well read the book and then tell me what you learned from it.  I’d love to see new advice.

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A great post I stumbled upon today:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/harpercollins/10-life-lessons-from-oscar-wilde-9npd

 

Jessica Wilson’s Reviews

 > The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

 

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
by Mark TwainGeorge Eliot (Afterword)

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Jessica Wilson‘s review

Mar 01, 14  ·  edit
Read from February 21 to March 01, 2014
A great adventure after another. Huck surprises you with his willingness of lying to protect a friend. The bonds of friendship as surpassed with Huck and Jim. In the end this classic novel is a part of history and culture that defines us as a country and of the type of people we are.

Procrastinating Part 2

I know I have covered procrastinating before.  (See “Procrastinating” post: 2011/09/08.)  And I even went so far as to think that I am the only writer who does procrastinate.  But now I find out that this phenomenon is not solely my problem but many other writers as well.  Attending countless writers conferences and hearing agents and editors all say the same thing about the problems of writers I just did not connect the dots till now.  I read an article posted by friend and it says that procrastinating is something all writers face. This is should not be a new concept but let’s just say I was a little slow to finally grasp the connection until I read this.  The article was spot on with all the problems I have and I am so glad to see I am not alone.  So for all I would like to say…..

“Hello, my name is Jessica.  I am a procrastinator.”

Why Writers Are the Worst Procrastinator

 

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Here are some videos that were required in a writing class. These are good for beginners.

and

and last but not least:

Enjoy!

Seth Adam Smith

Seeking the Northern Lights of Life

Bucket List Publications

Indulge- Travel, Adventure, & New Experiences

John M Cusick

Write. Represent.

Brooklyn Arden

One word at a time.

Jennifer Represents...

One word at a time.

Vintage Book Fairy

Exploring vintage books, papers and illustrations

Gwen Bristol

writing, marketing and life

Legends of Windemere

Enjoy the Adventure

Adventures in Agentland

One word at a time.

Anita Stansfield

One word at a time.

wetinkpresspublishing

Pre-publishing Services for eBooks and Print Publications

Nathan Bransford, Author

One word at a time.

Katherine Givens

Where romance ravishes history...

writersobsession

One word at a time.

Diary: 2015

the end of our world

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